L`italiana in Algeri-Concert Report

L`italianain Algeri-ConcertReport

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ConcertReport

OnSunday, 6thMarch at 3:00 p.m. at Claude L. Shaver Theater there were greatperformances by two musicians. I was very apprehensive to appear onthe concert since they played Capriccio Italien, which is amongst mypreferred pieces. Jake Heggie directed, and Jennifer Higdon asconcertmaster and vocalist.

Theconcert started with the Cold Mountain. The piece started slowly. Asthe pizzicato was plucked in accord, the French horn joined with aslow tune. The temperament turns into more melodramatic as itcontinued. The speed increased and the feel more penetrating withfugue-appearing entry. The various instruments prospered one another,up to the level they were finally all involved in accord. Thetrumpets were the main prominent troupes in the overture, efficientlyreinforced by the constant drum beats and clanging of the cymbals.The trumpets immediately substituted by the pizzicato, while thetrombones retroceded to the background, swiftly leading to the peakin the last part the piece.

Afterseveral minutes’ intermezzo, the orchestra performed the last threepieces of the night, although it was the Regale, and in specific theinitial movement, which is the most memorable to me. An excitingfeature of this piece is that it was written for a collaborativecomprising exclusively of cords. Initially, I was doubtfulconcerning this but later comprehended that the lack of chutzpa,woodwinds and beating instruments in no manner undermined from theefficiency of the piece. The consistency of the pitch was relativelynourishing, as the level of communication was impressively enrichedby the tenderness and affection of the voice.

Thelast piece that night was the Concerto, which started with anoutstanding solo violin tune, which established a high tenor to it.Conversely, the orchestra and specifically the pizzicato andpizzicato cellos joined and delivered an intense level of sustenance.Higdons`s solo juxtaposed fine with the orchestra, and ended in anunrelenting falsetto ethereal and exhaustive, signifying anotherrounded character.