Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship

Running Head: SUPERVISOR-SUPERVISEE RELATIONSHIP 1

Supervisor-SuperviseeRelationship

Nameof Student

Nameof Institution

Supervisor-SuperviseeRelationship

Thereare essential elements that assist in establishing a rapport with asupervisee. Some of these elements include the goals and theobjectives of the alliance. It is important to point out that whenthe both the supervisor and the supervisee are aware of the goals,then that is a good foundation to develop a rapport (Bradley, &ampLadany, 2001). That is informed by the fact that if the two areconscious of the objectives of the relationship, they are aware oftheir roles and responsibilities. Each of them would be expected tomeet their side of the bargain with the guidance of the professionalethics.

Clearlystated goals at the beginning, enables the parties to strategizetogether on how to go about achieving them. The relationship betweenthe supervisor and supervisee is anchored on the desired outcomes.Hence they would go out of their way and focus on the broadobjectives of the alliance (Creaner, 2014). A good working alliancewould enhance the rate and quality of the results. This is informedby the fact that an active collaboration enables them organize everyactivty together and hence come up with practical plans and avoidunnecessary delays.

However,there might be negative consequences to facilitating a good workingalliance with the supervisees. The supervisee might fail to adhere toprofessional ethics and hence fail to perform their roles andresponsibilities adequately (Frawley-O`Dea, &amp Sarnat, 2001). Suchfailure would interfere with the objectives of the alliance and henceaffect the quality of the outcomes. The supervisor might avoid thoseconsequences by demarcating the boundary between professional andpersonal conversations so that none is in conflict with the other.

Inconclusion, it is possible to develop a real alliance withsupervisees. However that is only possible if goals, roles andresponsibilities are defined for each of the parties.

References

Bradley,L. J., &amp Ladany, N. (2001). Counselorsupervision: Principles, process, and practice.Philadelphia, PA: Brunner-Routledge.

Creaner,M. (2014). Gettingthe best out of supervision in counselling and psychotherapy: A guidefor the supervisee.

Frawley-O`Dea,M. G., &amp Sarnat, J. E. (2001). Thesupervisory relationship: A contemporary psychodynamic approach.New York: Guilford Press.

Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship

Running Head: SUPERVISOR-SUPERVISEE RELATIONSHIP 1

Supervisor-SuperviseeRelationship

Supervisor-SuperviseeRelationship

Case

Dr.Martin has been the supervisor of Bernard, a master’s levelpsychologist who has been working as an intern on a part-time basisin the Buffalo University counseling center. Dr. Martin, aprofessional within the social work program, takes intern through theClinical interventions where Bernard is a student.

Whiletaking the students through the session, Bernard complains andexpresses his dissatisfaction with the direction of supervision ofhis work in the counseling center. Bernard explains that the approachused by Dr. Martin is not tactical and wholesome in developing abetter client management approach. According to Bernard, Dr. Martinonly tells him how to work with his clients without giving much himchance to present his input.

Thekind of supervisory approach that the supervisor employed towardsBernard was one-way. The decisions made were fully by the supervisorand Bernard did not influence a thing at all. Given that Bernardfully understands himself, he highly believes that this kind oflearning only prospers in an environment where people can give andtake, essentially, where there is dialogue. In this kind ofenvironment, Bernard expects to learn through discussions and evencollaborate with the supervisor.

Dr.Martin listens attentively to the grievances put across by Bernardbut views the dissatisfaction as resistance to supervision. Dr.Martin treats Bernard as an individual who is not open tosupervision. Interestingly, Dr. Martin is stubborn and decides not tochange his approach with Bernard.

Notably,it took a lot of courage for Bernard to offer a critical feedback tohis supervisor. Normally, most of the supervisees do not share intheir conflict with a supervisor given that they do not want tochallenge the supervisor (Frawley-O`Dea &amp Sarnat, 2001). Theirinability to offer feedback or be open is informed by the fact thatthe supervisor has the ability through evaluations andrecommendations to affect their career (Bradley &amp Ladany, 2001).Such students suffer through the supervision process and tolerate thestatus quo till they move on. Given that Bernard wants the best outof the internship, he offers feedback even though not positivelyconsidered by the supervisor (Creaner, 2014).

References

Bradley,L. J., &amp Ladany, N. (2001). Counselorsupervision: Principles, process, and practice.Philadelphia, PA: Brunner-Routledge.

Creaner,M. (2014). Gettingthe best out of supervision in counselling and psychotherapy: A guidefor the supervisee.

Frawley-O`Dea,M. G., &amp Sarnat, J. E. (2001). Thesupervisory relationship: A contemporary psychodynamic approach.New York: Guilford Press.